Tuesday, 15 March 2011

Oxfam, Running and Japan

Wow. Sorry to start with an exclamation. But I can't believe it's been more than two months since I last wrote anything in my blog.

What happened is that I started working for the Oxfam Running Team, supporting runners who are running and fundraising for Oxfam. Supporting is a broad term and my work there is varied and ranges from writing weekly email newsletters to counting (!) and sending off running vests - and everything else in between.

I am totally new to the world of fundraising, even more so to fundraising through running, which is still sort of unheard of back in Greece. It can be stressful and requires a lot of hard work and resilience, but at the same time it is highly rewarding.

Because you know, at least in Oxfam, that for every 1 pound raised, 81 p goes to emergency, campaigning and development work (out of the rest, 11 p goes to running costs and 8 p used to generate future income).

And you know that the field workers out there rely on you to do all their good work, so you also have to give it all your best.

As you can tell, I am tremendously enjoying it and especially getting in touch with our Oxfam runners and seeing what is in their mind as they are counting down towards their races. They are doing amazing in their fundraising effort - coming up with creative ways to raise money and inspire friends, family, coworkers and even strangers, to sponsor them. Their resourcefulness never ceases to surprise me. Well done, you!

P.S. And as my mind is constantly in Japan's woes at the moment, Oxfam has also set up a Japan relief fund (see Oxfam Japan aid). In these times of crisis, a small donation is the least I can do to help.

1 comment:

  1. Hi Natasha,

    Well done! Helping people is priceless!

    We had recently a similar experience. I must say I just made a donation and wasn't involved in the organization. Taking advantage of the Barcelona Marathon the association of runners I belong to had the opportunity to have a stand. The two previous days of the marathon we asked people for giving their old sporting shoes so to give them to needed people. What I mean for old is a shoe which is no longer suitable for running but can be used for walking.
    We raised so many as 534 pairs of shoes which was better than expected.
    I remember my donation of two pairs as being appreciated as I usually change my shoes every 500-600 km (I have about 5-6 pairs simultaneously)and after being cleaned they looked brand new!